Thursday, June 1, 2017

Future...


I've always preferred origin stories to endings, history over science fiction (at least give me fantasy that's set in a vague past sometime before the invention of the lightbulb). It's one of the things that I love about knitting - there's so much depth and richness to it, because it's been around for so long. Everything changes, but it also stays the same.

A project that I recently finished was a "hap shawl" - a traditional Shetland garment, updated slightly. It was very large and (for the most part) fairly simple, so I carried it around with me and worked on it everywhere. Which led to a lot of questions. For the most part, I just told people I was making "a fancy square." But if they seemed intrigued, I'd elaborate. About how it was fine yarn, to make it light, knit in a thick texture, to make it warm. That the size and shape made it versatile, so it could be wrapped around a baby or folded and worn as a scarf.

Knitting cannot be patented because it's too easy to reverse engineer - another knitter can look at a finished piece (or even a photo of it) and recreate it, close enough. But the way that patterns and traditions from the past have been handed down and passed around, tweaked and updated to the maker's preference, gives me hope that my pastime will survive long into the future.

Linking up with Five Minute Friday!

7 comments:

stephaniejthompson said...

Sarah, I also enjoy historical fiction. I love to find the connections in the characters who lived in a different landscape but share the same human passions and challenges. It gives me hope. I like the image of your knitting as it too remains connected (even in a different form) throughout time.

Patti Miinch said...

I always love reading your posts and am ashamed to admit that in the busy-ness of my life, I too often forget to check even my favorite blogs. Yes, I could subscribe, but then I probably wouldn't read the email. :( I followed the link to Ravelry -- I love that pattern!! Oh how I wish I was a more proficient knitter, and I hope you'll share a photo of your hap :)

Andrew said...

Loved this, Sarah. Though I'm not a knitter (hey, I'm a DUDE) I do understand...when I was well-enough I had to rediscover ways to make parts for very old aeroplanes. The materials, tools, and design philosophy were so different.

It was fun.I felt the past come alive around me.

#1 at FMF thsi week.

http://blessed-are-the-pure-of-heart.blogspot.com/2017/06/your-dying-spouse-318-pain-glory-and.html

Susan Shipe said...

I haven't been here in a while and am always glad when I read you. #16 FMF

SueQ said...

I admire anyone who knits. I've tried my hand at both knitting and crocheting but my scarves and dish clothes never turned out right so I gave up on both. :'( I may try my hand at both of them again one day. Maybe after my children are grown. ;-)

Mary Hood said...

Knitting is something I do for a while and then...Not. It seems to come in seasons. Maybe because I'm not great at it and always need some help. I love how you knitted your craft into this word. #74 this week.

Tara Ulrich said...

I so want to learn how to knit!