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Celebrate...

The weekly reckoning...
1952. Morning adventures with Brooklyn and Tobin
1953. Sitting on a park bench and sharing a food truck breakfast
1954. Finding just what I was looking for for a housewarming basket, made by a local artist
1955. Brooklyn's excitement over going to church and seeing Rosie (a girl her age)
1956. Boot weather
1957. Knitting Ephesians
1958. Tobin taking the book out of his mouth after I told him it wasn't a mouth toy, and going to chew on something else
1959. Early morning overdue letter writing
1960. Brooklyn and Tobin playing together
1961. A lovely get-to-know-you meeting for The Gathering
1962. An awesome co-leader
1963. Encouragement and commendation
1964. New Community, and a church that values community and baptism and communion
1965. An uplifting meeting with a friend/mentor
1966. People wanting things I'd knitted
1967. Getting an outline written for my 31 Days topic
1968. Tiny squares of chocolate on a pretty plate
1969. Going to bed early


I'm blessed with a man who puts reminders in his phone for dates like "the day we met," "first date," "proposal," and "first kiss," along with the more standard birthday and anniversary. He makes an effort to mention them, and sometimes unexpectedly turns up with sweet notes and/or flowers (see above photo).

I think it's important to live with an attitude of celebration - not just hitting the high points, but recognizing and celebrating the smaller moments, as well. National Doughnut Day. National Poetry Month. National Icecream Day. Butterfly Day (ok, that's one I made up as a kid - second Tuesday in October, have a picnic and watch for migrating butterflies. It's been a Mosbeck/Burch family tradition for over 15 years, so I think that makes it official). There's something for almost every day, or week, or month, of the year, if you need inspiration.

Or you can celebrate your own tiny victories. I heard someone say that your level of relief and celebration should equal the amount of stress and trouble that went into something - but so often I just breathe a quick breath at the end of a task and then plunge into the next one, without even stopping to recognize the accomplishment of the previous one.

I'd like to cultivate a better attitude of celebration. To learn to come to a full stop at the end of a difficult season or task, and rejoice at its completion before continuing on. To observe and commend both the growth and development of my two Tinies, and also that of the grown ups in my life (including myself). To discover that, really, any reason is a good reason to celebrate.

Blending One Thousand Gifts with Five Minute Friday - a weekly flashmob of bloggers that gather, internet wide, to write for five minutes (no stopping, no editing) on a prompt provided by sweet Kate, then link up and share a little comment love. For more info, more posts, and/or to join in, head here.

Comments

J Sparrows said…
Hey Sarah--

You're behind me on the five minute friday linkup today. :)

"Or you can celebrate your own tiny victories. I heard someone say that your level of relief and celebration should equal the amount of stress and trouble that went into something - but so often I just breathe a quick breath at the end of a task and then plunge into the next one, without even stopping to recognize the accomplishment of the previous one." I love this. Also, definitely needed to hear because I Just drew a lion's face for the first time, & the fact that it looks like a lion is amazing to me.

Until I get up close and see how imperfect it looks I need to work on celebrating I've stuck with it today for hours and it doesn't need to be perfect. Sigh. So hard to get to my heart.

Thanks for sharing this :)

Julia
Cherise L. C. said…
I love your thoughts! I'm guilty of the same head-long dash down my agenda, and I really need to pause and celebrate when I finish something. :)

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